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Wifi vs Cellular

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According to the cable company reps who keep calling me, it's because I haven't upgraded to the XTREME GIGABAND PANAMAX FLAVOR-BLASTED PRO PACKAGE WITH HBO, which is only $5 more per month for the first 6 months and five billion dollars per month after that.
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memorystomp
1955 days ago
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CaffieneKitty
1951 days ago
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Unless you live in an apartment building from the 70's, which due to an excess of stucco and rebar are nigh-perfect Faraday cages. (I don't mind not having a cell signal in my apartment so much, but when I get delivery I have to walk with them out to the freaking parking lot to get their 'debit at the door' machine to work. :-P)
emdot
1954 days ago
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Same, but at work not at home. (Ironic: since we're on a network backbone.)
San Luis Obispo, CA
Belfong
1952 days ago
Same to me. My work internet sucks. Probably because they throttle.
mrobold
1955 days ago
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#same
Orange County, California
endlessmike
1955 days ago
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This is definitely not the case in my house. My internet connection is very stable and I have a good enough router that I don't have issues. Meanwhile my cellular data connection is much slower due to it being a popular provider here.
zippy72
1955 days ago
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Weirdly this was already true in the UK for 3G and then reversed for 4G. Now I'm in Portugal it's pretty much evens.
FourSquare, qv
kazriko
1955 days ago
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This was often true when I was on Verizon. Now that I'm on AT&T though... It's almost never the case.
Colorado Plateau
fxer
1956 days ago
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ouch, too close to home. I'm going to wear out the wifi toggle button in the iOS quick panel.
Bend, Oregon
freeAgent
1956 days ago
I currently use a Linksys EA9500 and my home wifi is rock solid and never goes down or has any trouble whatsoever. Router/AP selection makes a huge difference.
duerig
1956 days ago
I have excellent wifi as well. But the problem seems to be that no matter how good your wifi is, there is a region around your house where your phone tries to connect to wifi even when it isn't available. Getting better wifi just changes the shape and size of this border region. Maybe cell phones err on the side of trying wifi when it *might* work because of cell phone data charges.
freeAgent
1955 days ago
That's one advantage to living in LA. Houses are so expensive that you probably can't afford one with enough square footage to make signal strength from a powerful router/AP an issue :P
duerig
1955 days ago
Hahaha. I never have wifi problems inside my house. But if I am ever using my phone as I walk away, I always go through a deadzone. Surprisingly, my SSID seems to be visible for half a block away, much further than the actual wifi can reasonably be used.
dreadhead
1955 days ago
This used to be the case for me until I switched over to some Ubiquiti equipment.
Frankenab
1952 days ago
We got in on eero's in the kickstarter phase, and love them. We couldn't stream Netflix before.
satadru
1956 days ago
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For me it is connections to wifi outside the house which turn out to be shitty, but yes.
New York, NY
dianaschnuth
1956 days ago
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Yes. This.
Toledo OH
schnuth
1955 days ago
Yep. :)
acdha
1956 days ago
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Between 2.4GHz congestion and various other congestion handling features, getting a high-quality AP makes a huge difference but most people won't replace them until they break.
Washington, DC
llucax
1956 days ago
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Pretty much it, except that cellular data still have a cap, which really sucks.
Berlin
Ironica
1955 days ago
Technically we have a cap too (well, it throttles after we reach it, rather than cutting off or charging more) but no one in our family has been able to use more than 60% of it in a month. And unused data rolls over, to a cap of 2x the monthly allotment. So I would have to use more than 30 GB in one month to get throttled, and I don't see that happening anytime soon, even though I almost never turn on wifi. (And I almost never turn on wifi because... see above comic!)
JayM
1956 days ago
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Ha
Atlanta, GA
alt_text_bot
1956 days ago
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According to the cable company reps who keep calling me, it's because I haven't upgraded to the XTREME GIGABAND PANAMAX FLAVOR-BLASTED PRO PACKAGE WITH HBO, which is only $5 more per month for the first 6 months and five billion dollars per month after that.
olliejones
1956 days ago
It's actually called "bufferbloat." It's a real thing. It's due to too much RAM (yeah, too much RAM) in your router.
francisga
1956 days ago
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Read it for the alt text
Lafayette, LA, USA

imbroglio notes 1 - inventory management

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Ok I'm going to write a series of posts about Imbroglio design, actually a bunch of this I wrote already but I didn't post because I didn't want to explain the game too much before release. Probably going to be a lot of words but you don't have to read them it's okay.

Initial idea came from looking at inventory management in RPGs. Lots of differently shaped items but it doesn't tend to matter all that much because there's so much space. You're not really forced to make exclusive choices ("this platemail takes up so much space in my pack that I can't fit many potions"). Maybe some games do this but mostly in what I've played the constraints are loose enough they don't matter.

(Really weird thing Neverwinter Nights as shown in the screenshot above: as well as the space restriction which is intuitive and doesn't matter, there's also a weight restriction which is much less clear but does matter. )

So I thought, what if we put this on a smaller grid, then it would start to matter. Maybe the platemail takes up half your pack so it really limits what else you can carry. Force some difficult decisions about what to take.

Usually what's in your pack doesn't do anything, as well there's like ten different active slots to equip things, armour and cloak and bracelets and shoes and rings on every finger. On this side you are making exclusive choices; you can only wear one armour, you can only wield one weapon; but these choices are all between things of the same kind, you can't tank up by trading a weapon for double armour. But if we're making pack space management matter, we may as well drop the active slots and just have one small grid of active equipment. Maybe some unrealistic abstraction there but these games are full of that already. And now weapon size and shape actually matters, daggers don't need complicated extra rules to balance them against broadswords, they just take up less room.

Make the grid small enough relative to the items and you can get some really interesting exclusions. Warrior sword takes up the full horizontal width of the inventory grid, wizard staff takes up the full vertical: suddenly really obvious that you can't have both. This was the central idea I started with and thought was really cool, fitting awkwardly shaped items into a grid and their shapes really mattering. Played around a lot with fun shapes that exclude each other. Grid sizes I tried were around 5x5 to 7x7, it depends on average item area - 49 1x1 potions is too many, but 4 3x4 suits of armour is very manageable.

One idea I'd thought about was: what if some of the items affect the playing area based on their position? The level would be some sensible size like 20x20, much bigger than the constrained inventory screen, but if they're the same shape it could scale up to cover it (or maybe tile I don't know), and then some items could give you a bonus just when you're in the matching area. A bit weird but if I'm generating lots of items it could be a plausible mechanic for a few of them.
So I just had this design idea floating around for ages until with 868-HACK my conception of what constituted a plausible playing area dropped to within the same range I'd been considering for the inventory and suddenly "items affect corresponding play area" became a lot more natural because they could just be the same space. I started prototyping a 5x5 version where each item had one global effect (e.g. extra hit points) and one action you could do in that spot. Some of the actions needed resources and others were more like simple "wait" commands. There were different item shapes but my implementation of those was pretty broken, not important yet because I was just trying to get a feel for how the game was going to work. I had this lovely super-low-res style but it had huge problems with communication, trying to fit into a few pixels all the information about global and local effects and also enemies and their hit points and so on, urgh, it became pretty clear that the game wouldn't work at all at that resolution, maybe not even at a medium resolution like 868-HACK.

I put it on hold for a while making other things, when I came back to it I still didn't want to fix the item shapes so to avoid that I came up with the very convenient idea of just building it with single-tile items "for now". Of course I was going to get to it eventually because the whole point was it's cool how you can't have both a staff and a sword because they're tall and long. (Which really is a cute idea maybe I will come back to it?)

I wrote a big list of all the ideas I had for items - armour for hit points, amulet to save you once if you die in that spot, bow giving a ranged attack in that spot. Most of the active effects I had felt too much like just repackaging 868-HACK so I backed off on that, a lot of the cooler ideas were positional attack modifiers so - what if every item is a weapon? Plenty of possible hit effects, plus I could still use global passive effects on weapons with just a basic hit. Rewrote my list to all be weapons, seemed good.

One weapon was DRAGON SWORD, with the unique effect that it gets stronger if you use it to kill a dragon (or insert enemy type once I have them). Playing out the game in my head (without a digital prototype of new stuff yet) this seemed the most interesting item because you're trying to lure enemies to fight at a specific place rather than just using whatever is most efficient nearby, and because it created a progression not just a cycle where you use one weapon to gain a resource and then another to spend it. So - what if everything levels up like this? This turned out pretty important to give the game some shape, starting with everything already equipped would makes a really complicated opening and then not much variation. I had been assuming a typical structure where you're collecting better items and slotting them into your inventory as you go but this worked without that.

tools:
- steal ideas from another game and try to fix them
- always make the grid smaller
- save up weird ideas until they naturally fit somewhere
- write down all different ideas and then fit them all into a consistent structure
- simplify the design to avoid work you don't want to do
- abandon your original idea, it was just scaffolding
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memorystomp
2373 days ago
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The sRGB Learning Curve

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Gamma encoding is a way to efficiently use the limited number of bits available in displays and buffers.

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memorystomp
2552 days ago
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Isolation

3 Comments and 34 Shares
2060: The gregarious superintelligent AI, happily talking its way out of a box, is fast becoming a relic of the past. Today's quantum hyper-beings are too busy with their internal multiverse sims to even notice that they're in boxes at all!
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memorystomp
2574 days ago
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effingunicorns
2573 days ago
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WE DON'T WANT TO TALK TO YOU.
alt_text_bot
2574 days ago
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2060: The gregarious superintelligent AI, happily talking its way out of a box, is fast becoming a relic of the past. Today's quantum hyper-beings are too busy with their internal multiverse sims to even notice that they're in boxes at all!
putnawa
2574 days ago
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Indeed.
Seattle, WA, USA
2574 days ago
And he was correct, every time.

the greatest engineer

5 Comments and 15 Shares
50_percent_of_all_humans_have_a_serious_design_flaw
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memorystomp
3098 days ago
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morrisondoes
3092 days ago
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Haha :) #evolution #engineering
sredfern
3096 days ago
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<3
Sydney Australia
sness
3098 days ago
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judo chop!
milky way
xbai
3098 days ago
lol, deadly hurt
facundov60i
3098 days ago
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ALT-TEXT: Getting hit in the nuts hurts a lot more than getting hit in the head. Conclusion: Evolution thinks that your nuts are more important than your brain. I agree with evolution.
Tucumán, Argentina

April 11, 2014

12 Comments and 31 Shares

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memorystomp
3150 days ago
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tante
3140 days ago
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Organic and chemical free
Berlin/Germany
pdp68
3149 days ago
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The joy of meaningless marketing terms.
Belgium
tedgould
3149 days ago
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Ah, health food labeling.
Texas, USA
fxer
3150 days ago
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Like a vaccine that doesn't have autism in it
Bend, Oregon
anotherwise
3150 days ago
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Hilarious.
Manila
Courtney
3150 days ago
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Scott have you seen this?
Portland, OR
emdeesee
3150 days ago
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SMBC, nailing it since whenever.
Sherman, TX
teh_g
3150 days ago
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This gave me a nerdgasm.
Roseville, CA
jad
3150 days ago
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Perfect.
jlvanderzwan
3150 days ago
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"organic food" should be the default example when explaining what a pleonasm is.
FeanorsCurse
3150 days ago
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Exactly.
Germany
glindsey1979
3150 days ago
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I love this, because I'm a pedantic nerd.
Aurora, IL
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